International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences

| Peer-Reviewed |

Choosing an Optimal Suture Material for Prehepatic Portal Hypertension Modeling

Received: 29 October 2016    Accepted: 21 November 2016    Published: 18 January 2017
Views:       Downloads:

Share This Article

Abstract

If the catheter size, the thickness of a thread, the place for ligation were determined for the partial portal vein ligation (PPVL), the question of the suture material remains open. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal suture material (silk or prolene) for PPVL. The experiment was performed on 25 male adult outbred rats. The PPVL was carried out using the catheter 20G with thread 4-0. Portal pressure was measured before and 15 days after ligation. The measurements were performed by the differential manometer Testo 510 (Germany), which was connected to the catheter 24G, located in the distal part of the superior mesenteric vein. The animals were divided into two groups: the first group (n=12) – portal vein (PV) was ligated with silk, and the second group (n=13) – PV was ligated with prolene. The average values of portal pressure before PPVL in experimental animals were 7,50 ± 0,20 mmHg. All animals survived in the first group. 7 rats in the second group died on the 1-2 day after surgery because of PV thrombosis. There were no significant differences in the average values of portal pressure in the comparison groups after 15 days: the first group (n = 12) - 11,44 ± 0,06 mmHg, the second group (n = 6) - 11,24 ± 0,04 mm Hg. Despite the same type of portal hypertension model and its equal severity, the use of prolene thread caused a greater propensity to PV thrombosis.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14
Published in International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences (Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2016)
Page(s) 117-121
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Portal Hypertension, Partial Portal Vein Ligation, Prolene, Silk

References
[1] D. V. Garbuzenko, “Experimental methods of portal hypertension studying,” Ros. zhurn. gastrojenterol., gepatol., koloproktol., vol. 20, pp. 4-12, Oct. 2010.
[2] A. R. Silva, R. J. Kriguer-Júnior, L. C. Serigiolle, H. M. Gomes, D. A. Rodrigues et al., “Increase in spleen volume of rats on experimental model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension,” Arq. Bras. Cir. Dig., vol. 26, pp. 206-212, Jul.-Sep. 2013.
[3] D.A. Rodrigues, A. R. da Silva, L. C. Serigiolle, Rde S. Fidalgo, S. S. Favero et al., “Constriction rate variation produced by partial ligation of the portal vein at pre-hepatic portal hypertension induced in rats,” Arq. Bras. Cir. Dig., vol. 27, pp. 280-284, Nov.-Dec. 2014.
[4] A. Islam, A. Ehsan, “Comparison of suture material and technique of closure of subcutaneous fat and skin in caesarean section,” N. Am. J. Med. Sci., vol. 3, pp. 85–88, Feb. 2011.
[5] I. A. Savenko, U. V. Usmansky, M. N. Ivashev, A. V. Sergienko, T. A. Lysenko et al., “Chance of veterinary medicine in experimental pharmacology,” Fundamental'nye issledovanija, vol. 5, pp. 422-425, May 2012.
[6] N. O. Arefyev, D. V. Garbuzenko, “Choosing an optimal method of partial portal vein ligation for extrahepatic portal hypertension modeling,” Vestn. Soveta molodyh uchjonyh i specialistov Cheljab. obl., vol. 1, pp. 14-19, Mar. 2016.
[7] M. I. Morgan-Martins, S. I. Jacques, R. M. Hartmann, C. M. Marques, C. A. Marroni et al., “Protection of estrogen in portal hypertension gastropathy: an experimental model,” Arq Gastroenterol., vol. 48, pp. 211-216, Jul.-Sep. 2011.
[8] C. Marques, J. L. Mauriz, D. Simonetto, C. A. Marroni, M. J. Tuñon et al., “Glutamine prevents gastric oxidative stress in an animal model of portal hypertension gastropathy,” Ann. Hepatol., vol. 10, pp. 531-539, Oct.-Dec. 2011.
[9] M. Ohta, K. Tanoue, A.S. Tarnawski, R. Pai, R. M. Itani et al., “Overexpressed nitric oxide synthase in portal-hypertensive stomach of rat: A key to increased susceptibility to damage,” Gastroenterology, vol. 112, pp. 1920–1930, Jun. 1997.
[10] S. Kai, T. Bandoh, M. Ohta, T. Matsumoto, M. Tominaga et al., “Expression of endothelin receptors in the gastric mucosa of portal hypertensive rats,” J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol., vol. 21, pp. 242–250, Jan. 2006.
[11] F. Sánchez-Patán, M. A. Aller, M. T. Corcuera, F. Vara, I. Casado et al., “Chronic inflammatory portal hypertensive enteropathy in the rat,” Cir Esp., vol. 80, pp. 162-167, Sep. 2006.
[12] M. T. Corcuera Pindado, M. P. Nava Hidalgo, A. Angulo Burgos, M. A. Aller Reyero, F. Gómez Aguado et al., “Splanchnic remodeling secondary to experimental prehepatic portal hypertension,” An. Med. Interna., vol. 22, pp. 317-322, Jul. 2005.
[13] M. A. Aller, N. de las Heras, M. P. Nava, J. Regadera, J. Arias et al., “Splanchnic-aortic inflammatory axis in experimental portal hypertension,” World J. Gastroenterol., vol. 19, pp. 7992-7999, Nov. 2013.
[14] M. A. Llamas, M. A. Aller, D. Marquina, M. P. Nava, J. Arias, “Bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes increases in chronic portal hypertensive rats,” Dig. Dis. Sci., vol. 55, pp. 2244-2254, Aug. 2010.
[15] Y. Yokoyama, A. Wawrzyniak, A. M. Sarmadi, R. Baveja, H.E. Gruber et al, “Hepatic arterial flow becomes the primary supply of sinusoids following partial portal vein ligation in rats,” J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol., vol. 21, pp. 1567-1574, Oct. 2006.
[16] Y. Yokoyama, R. Baveja, N. Sonin, M. G. Clemens, J. X. Zhang, “Hepatic neovascularization after partial portal vein ligation: novel mechanism of chronic regulation of blood flow,” Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol., vol. 280, pp. 21-31, Jan. 2001.
[17] F. Sánchez-Patán, R. Anchuelo, M. A. Aller, E. Vara, C. García, “Chronic prehepatic portal hypertension in the rat: is it a type of metabolic inflammatory syndrome,” Lipids Health Dis., vol. 7, pp. 1-10, Feb. 2008.
[18] F. Eizayaga, C. Scorticati, J. P. Prestifilippo, S. Romay, M. A. Fernandez et al., “Altered blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with prehepatic portal hypertension turns to normal when portal pressure is lowered,” World J. Gastroenterol., vol. 12, pp. 1367-1372, Mar. 2006.
[19] I. Colle, A. M. Geerts, C. Van Steenkiste, H. Van Vlierberghe, “Hemodynamic changes in splanchnic blood vessels in portal hypertension,” Anat. Rec. (Hoboken), vol.291, pp.699-713, Jun. 2008.
[20] M. Fernandez, F. Vizzutti, J. C. Garcia-Pagan, J. Rodes, J. Bosch, “Anti-VEGF receptor-2 monoclonal antibody prevents portal-systemic collateral vessel formation in portal hypertensive mice,” Gastroenterology, vol. 126, pp. 886-894, Mar. 2004.
[21] M. Fernandez, M. Mejias, B. Angermayr, J. C. Garcia-Pagan, J. Rodes et al, “Inhibition of VEGF receptor-2 decreases the development of hyperdynamic splanchnic circulation and portal-systemic collateral vessels in portal hypertensive rats,” J. Hepatol., vol. 43, pp. 98-103, Apr. 2005.
[22] B. Angermayr, M. Fernandez, M. Mejias, “NAD (P)H oxidase modulates angiogenesis and the development of portosystemic collaterals and splanchnic hyperaemia in portal hypertensive rats,” Gut, vol. 56, pp. 560-564, Apr. 2007.
[23] E. Sikuler, D. Kravetz, R. J. Groszmann, “Evolution of portal hypertension and mechanisms involved in its maintenance in a rat model,” Am. J. Physiol., vol. 248, pp. 618-625, Jun. 1985.
[24] J. Vorobioff, J. E. Bredfeldt, R. J. Groszmann, “Hyperdynamic circulation in portal-hypertensive rat model: A primary factor for maintenence of chronic portal hypertension,” Am. J. Physiol., vol. 244, pp. 52-57, Jan. 1983.
[25] L. S. Jensen, N. Kraup, J. A. Larsen, C. Juhl, T. H. Nielsen et al., “Chronic portal venous hypertension. The effect on liver blood flow and liver function and the development of esophageal varices,” Scand. J. Gastroenterol., vol. 22, pp. 463-470, May 1987.
[26] M. A. Aller, M. Mendez, M. P. Nava, L. Lopez, J. L. Arias et al., “The value of microsurgery in liver research,” Liver Int., vol. 29, pp. 1132-1140, Sep. 2009.
[27] M. Chojkier, R. J. Groszmann, “Measurement of portal-systemic shunting in the rat by using gamma-labeled microspheres,” Am. J. Physiol., vol. 240, pp. 371-375, May 1981.
[28] Z. Wen, J. Z. Zhang, H. M. Xia, C. X. Yang, Y. J. Chen, “Stability of a rat model of prehepatic portal hypertension caused by partial ligation of the portal vein,” World J. Gastroenterol., vol. 15, pp. 4049-4054, Aug. 2009.
[29] S. Takei, K. Yamaga, T. Dobashi, A. Sakanishi, M. Hasegawa et al., “Extensibility and strength of surgical sutures for ophthalmology,” Journal of Japanese Society of Biorheology, vol. 2, pp. 27-33, Mar. 1988.
Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Nikolay Olegovich Arefyev, Dmitry Victorovich Garbuzenko, Linar Rinatovich Khasanov. (2017). Choosing an Optimal Suture Material for Prehepatic Portal Hypertension Modeling. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences, 2(6), 117-121. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14

    Copy | Download

    ACS Style

    Nikolay Olegovich Arefyev; Dmitry Victorovich Garbuzenko; Linar Rinatovich Khasanov. Choosing an Optimal Suture Material for Prehepatic Portal Hypertension Modeling. Int. J. Clin. Exp. Med. Sci. 2017, 2(6), 117-121. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14

    Copy | Download

    AMA Style

    Nikolay Olegovich Arefyev, Dmitry Victorovich Garbuzenko, Linar Rinatovich Khasanov. Choosing an Optimal Suture Material for Prehepatic Portal Hypertension Modeling. Int J Clin Exp Med Sci. 2017;2(6):117-121. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14

    Copy | Download

  • @article{10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14,
      author = {Nikolay Olegovich Arefyev and Dmitry Victorovich Garbuzenko and Linar Rinatovich Khasanov},
      title = {Choosing an Optimal Suture Material for Prehepatic Portal Hypertension Modeling},
      journal = {International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences},
      volume = {2},
      number = {6},
      pages = {117-121},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijcems.20160206.14},
      abstract = {If the catheter size, the thickness of a thread, the place for ligation were determined for the partial portal vein ligation (PPVL), the question of the suture material remains open. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal suture material (silk or prolene) for PPVL. The experiment was performed on 25 male adult outbred rats. The PPVL was carried out using the catheter 20G with thread 4-0. Portal pressure was measured before and 15 days after ligation. The measurements were performed by the differential manometer Testo 510 (Germany), which was connected to the catheter 24G, located in the distal part of the superior mesenteric vein. The animals were divided into two groups: the first group (n=12) – portal vein (PV) was ligated with silk, and the second group (n=13) – PV was ligated with prolene. The average values of portal pressure before PPVL in experimental animals were 7,50 ± 0,20 mmHg. All animals survived in the first group. 7 rats in the second group died on the 1-2 day after surgery because of PV thrombosis. There were no significant differences in the average values of portal pressure in the comparison groups after 15 days: the first group (n = 12) - 11,44 ± 0,06 mmHg, the second group (n = 6) - 11,24 ± 0,04 mm Hg. Despite the same type of portal hypertension model and its equal severity, the use of prolene thread caused a greater propensity to PV thrombosis.},
     year = {2017}
    }
    

    Copy | Download

  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Choosing an Optimal Suture Material for Prehepatic Portal Hypertension Modeling
    AU  - Nikolay Olegovich Arefyev
    AU  - Dmitry Victorovich Garbuzenko
    AU  - Linar Rinatovich Khasanov
    Y1  - 2017/01/18
    PY  - 2017
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14
    T2  - International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences
    JF  - International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences
    JO  - International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences
    SP  - 117
    EP  - 121
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2469-8032
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijcems.20160206.14
    AB  - If the catheter size, the thickness of a thread, the place for ligation were determined for the partial portal vein ligation (PPVL), the question of the suture material remains open. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal suture material (silk or prolene) for PPVL. The experiment was performed on 25 male adult outbred rats. The PPVL was carried out using the catheter 20G with thread 4-0. Portal pressure was measured before and 15 days after ligation. The measurements were performed by the differential manometer Testo 510 (Germany), which was connected to the catheter 24G, located in the distal part of the superior mesenteric vein. The animals were divided into two groups: the first group (n=12) – portal vein (PV) was ligated with silk, and the second group (n=13) – PV was ligated with prolene. The average values of portal pressure before PPVL in experimental animals were 7,50 ± 0,20 mmHg. All animals survived in the first group. 7 rats in the second group died on the 1-2 day after surgery because of PV thrombosis. There were no significant differences in the average values of portal pressure in the comparison groups after 15 days: the first group (n = 12) - 11,44 ± 0,06 mmHg, the second group (n = 6) - 11,24 ± 0,04 mm Hg. Despite the same type of portal hypertension model and its equal severity, the use of prolene thread caused a greater propensity to PV thrombosis.
    VL  - 2
    IS  - 6
    ER  - 

    Copy | Download

Author Information
  • Department of Faculty Surgery, South Ural State Medical University, Chelyabinsk, Russia

  • Department of Faculty Surgery, South Ural State Medical University, Chelyabinsk, Russia

  • Department of Faculty Surgery, South Ural State Medical University, Chelyabinsk, Russia

  • Sections