Volume 6, Issue 4, July 2020, Page: 71-78
Prevalence of Perinatal Mortality and Associated Factors Among Neonate Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Jimma Medical Center, Oromia Region, Ethiopia
Abiru Neme, Institute of Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Jimma University, Oromia, Ethiopia
Gadisa Bekele, Institute of Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Jimma University, Oromia, Ethiopia
Gebeye Muleta, Institute of Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Jimma University, Oromia, Ethiopia
Received: May 20, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 1, 2020;       Published: Aug. 18, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20200604.14      View  189      Downloads  61
Abstract
Background: Death of an infant in utero or at birth has been always a devastating experience for the mother and of the concern in clinical practice. Infant mortality remains a challenge in the care of pregnant women worldwide, but particularly for developing countries and the need to understand contributory factors is crucial for addressing appropriate perinatal health. Objective: To assess perinatal mortality and associated factors among neonate admitted to neonatal intensive care unit of Jimma medical center, Jimma zone, Oromia region, Southwest Ethiopia, 2019. Method: One year retrospective study was conducted from April 10 to April 25, 2019 among neonate admitted to neonatal intensive care unit of Jimma Medical center. All neonate admitted to neonatal intensive care unit from April 10 to April 25, 2019 was included in the study. Descriptive statistics were used to analyses data by using SPSS version 21. The relationship between perinatal death and fetal or neonatal characteristics were analyzed. Significance association was made when p < 0.05. Results: There was 191 total neonates admitted and 186 were included in the study period. The rate of perinatal death was 29.6%. The majority 156 (83.9%) of mother mode of delivery were spontaneous vaginal delivery. The dominant cause of admission to NICU was Sepsis followed by low birth weight and prematurity while the least was Perinatal Asphyxia and congenital malformation. The common cause of death among those admitted to NICU was prematurity, sepsis which accounts 67.9% and 20.75% respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that the magnitude of perinatal death at Jimma University Medical Centre is high. Most of babies were dying because of prematurity and sepsis. Improving quality of antenatal care and increasing awareness of women’s about danger signs of pregnancy, important place to focus to initiate cascade of improvement in poor perinatal outcome is necessary.
Keywords
Perinatal, Mortality, Neonatal, Intensive, Care and Jimma Medical Center
To cite this article
Abiru Neme, Gadisa Bekele, Gebeye Muleta, Prevalence of Perinatal Mortality and Associated Factors Among Neonate Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Jimma Medical Center, Oromia Region, Ethiopia, International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medical Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2020, pp. 71-78. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcems.20200604.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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